The Rector Writes – World War 1 Remembrance and Tullow Parish

They shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore.’ Isaiah 2:4.
At ‘the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month’ the guns of World War 1 fell silent with the signing of the Armistice. That agreement to cease hostilities was supposed to bring to an end the war to end all wars but alas, more recent history has sadly proven otherwise. Even in today’s world, war and civil strife brings untold hardship and misery to the estimated 68.5 million people fleeing war and persecution in 2018 – the greatest number in history. This year marks the centenary of the end of World War 1 and there has never been a better time for humanity to pledge themselves to the causes of freedom, justice and peace. Jesus said ‘Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.’ Matthew 5:9. Therefore, in all that we do, say and are, let us strive to be children of God.
During the course of last month the centenary of the sinking of the M.V. Leinster was marked with a plethora of exhibitions and talks. Of particular interest here in Tullow was the death of Sophia Violet Barrett who lost her life in that incident. Known as Violet to her family, she was a member of the St. John Ambulance Carrickmines Nursing Division and was returning to duty at No 2 Stationary Hospital, Abbeville, France where she nursed German prisioners when she perished. Violet was related through marriage to the Wilson family of Carrickmines House where she had spent a brief holiday before her death. The Wilson Family lost four of their five sons in World War 1 and a memorial window in Tullow Church marks their ultimate sacrifice.

 

Rev. John Tanner.

Tel: 01 2893154 or 086 3021376

their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore.’ Isaiah 2:4.
At ‘the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month’ the guns of World War 1 fell silent with the signing of the Armistice. That agreement to cease hostilities was supposed to bring to an end the war to end all wars but alas, more recent history has sadly proven otherwise. Even in today’s world, war and civil strife brings untold hardship and misery to the estimated 68.5 million people fleeing war and persecution in 2018 – the greatest number in history. This year marks the centenary of the end of World War 1 and there has never been a better time for humanity to pledge themselves to the causes of freedom, justice and peace. Jesus said ‘Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.’ Matthew 5:9. Therefore, in all that we do, say and are, let us strive to be children of God.
During the course of last month the centenary of the sinking of the M.V. Leinster was marked with a plethora of exhibitions and talks. Of particular interest here in Tullow was the death of Sophia Violet Barrett who lost her life in that incident. Known as Violet to her family, she was a member of the St. John Ambulance Carrickmines Nursing Division and was returning to duty at No 2 Stationary Hospital, Abbeville, France where she nursed German prisioners when she perished. Violet was related through marriage to the Wilson family of Carrickmines House where she had spent a brief holiday before her death. The Wilson Family lost four of their five sons in World War 1 and a memorial window in Tullow Church marks their ultimate sacrifice.

 

Rev. John Tanner.

Tel: 01 2893154 or 086 3021376

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